Inflammation and free radicals: key players in the link between diabetes and cardiovascular disease?

Speaker: 
Professor Ian Megson (University of Highlands and Islands)
Date: 
Friday, 3 March, 2017 - 13:00
Location: 
Tanis Drummond Lecture Theatre, Level 5, Ninewells Hospital & Medical School
 
The visiting speaker in the ETM seminar series on Friday 3rd March 2017 is Professor Ian Megson, Head of the Division of Health Research & Innovation at the University of the Highlands & Islands.
 
The focus of his research is the role of nitric oxide in vascular disease and the potential benefits of nitric oxide donor drugs as vasodilators, anti-platelet agents and anti-inflammatory agents. Professor Megson’s interests include the interaction of nitric oxide with oxidant species and establishment of the importance of this interaction in the atherosclerotic process that underlies heart disease. Through collaboration with Prof Adriano Rossi (Centre for Inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh), he has expanded his research profile to encompass the role of NO in inflammatory cell apoptosis and, via several other collaborations, the therapeutic potential of NO in diseases as diverse as fungal toenail infection and trypanosomiasis. Furthermore, he has been involved in projects relating to acute renal failure (principle investigator), organ transplant (principal investigator), pre-eclampsia, and the potential benefits of novel coatings to prevent thrombosis in medical devices.
 
If you would like to meet Professor Megson during his visit please contact Dr Calum Sutherland, c.d.sutherland@dundee.ac.uk.
 
 
Abstract
 
The principal hypothesis for our research is that oxidative stress and inflammation represent the axis of evil that links diabetes to cardiovascular disease. The seminar will discuss research from a range of projects that explore the driving forces behind oxidative stress and inflammation, the mechanism by which these processes influence cardiovascular pathology and function and the benefits and drawbacks of some of the interventions that might be implicated.
Department: 
School of Medicine